Home

Farewell Segment

Written three years ago after submitting my resignation to Segment

After the most amazing year and a half of working at Segment, I have submitted my resignation.

I joined Segment when the company was still operating out of a live-work loft in SOMA, and we were only 14 employees. During my interview, we all gathered in the office kitchen and made dinner together. There was an incredible family vibe that was unlike any work environment I’ve experienced before. The company started to grow. Everyone was very proud of breaking 1 million dollars in annual revenue — a growth mark that many SaaS startups dream of achieving.

My role when joining the company was to start the Enterprise Success team. Until that point, Jake (Segment’s first employee) and often Peter (the CEO) had been handling all support requests. They were closing more than 100 support tickets per day! Half of the company’s revenue depended on a handful of enterprise customers and Segment had no one on the payroll to proactively offer dedicated service to those VIP customers. My role was to make sure Segment delivered on promises, and that enterprise customers were happy and used the product to its full potential.

During the past year and a half, we worked long, fun hours. Segment grew to a company of more than 50 employees and surpassed the 10 million dollars in annual revenue mark. I am very proud of the work accomplished. Segment holds a very special place in my heart — the caliber of its employees and customers, and the elegance of its product is hard to surpass. With my resignation letter, I also compiled a list of my favorite moments:

That time I Told Our Biggest Client To Not Use Our Product

My favorite moment from my time working at Segment was the time I asked Peter for guidance and advice as we discovered that our largest paying client — who represented a significant portion of our annual revenue — could have a better and cheaper experience processing their data outside of Segment (for their particular use case). Without hesitation, Peter was 100% on board about exposing the client to the alternative solution outside of Segment that would make their data process cheaper and faster. Once I told the client their alternatives, they explained that even though there might be better fitting services for their use case, they would still choose Segment because “by having Segment in charge of that part of the business, we have nothing to worry about.”

That Time We Fired A Client

I remember that one time we fired one of our few enterprise customers for being ungrateful, disrespectful, but mostly, that enterprise client got fired as a customer for throwing Jake and me under the bus.

That Time My Colleagues Were Being Amazing (every day, really)

I remember all those times that the engineering team would add instructions to a chat robot that completed some of my mundane tasks to make my workflow more efficient and exciting. And that the robot replied to me using Air Traffic Control lingo — as a reminder of one of my previous lives. I also remember the time off the coast of Mexico when (with other Segment ladies) we jumped off a boat to surf out in the open sea for the first time. And when we showed up that Sunday morning to the start line of the SF marathon and ran 13.1 miles for the first time. And when some of my colleagues showed up to the airport without knowing I was taking them to countries they’ve never been. And when we celebrated the 2014 holidays sitting on the empty floor of the new office, eating pizza and cheering with cans of soda. And when Peter explained the change on equity terms allowing employees ten years (instead of 90 days) to exercise our options.

For all these moments and people I’ve met, I am grateful. After spending the past three months building projects and javascripting under the direction of the fine folks at HackReactor, I am ready to take some time off from work. Until I welcome my first child into the world (in less than two months!), you will find me hacking in some project remotely from my living room.